Ladner’s Opportunity to be a Street Design Leader

Let me introduce you to my hometown, Delta, BC. More specifically, the suburb of Ladner. Ladner is a flat, highly walkable place and has missed, what I think, is a golden opportunity.

The greatest change in elevation that I can observe is 11m. Which is hardly a change when you consider it’s across an entire suburb. With the flatness that is Ladner, it’s disappointing to see that Ladner hasn’t evolved into a bike-fiendly place. With a little support from the corporation, we could be a regional leader in multi-modal infrastructure and active transportation.

Delta has been recently undertaking lots of infrastructure improvements and it’s really pleased me to see how they’ve incorporated the walking aspect into their improvements but they have completely forgotten the bicycle. Might I point out the recent “improvements” at

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Arthur Drive & Ladner Trunk. While the intersection was widened and dedicated turning lanes were added to increase the flow of cars, pedestrian safety was jeopardized and the wider layout just encourages speeding. Might I note that this intersection is frequented by students who attend Delta Secondary (student body of about 1300). It’s too bad Delta has ignored that fact that most students can’t drive and are driven to school.

I would have expected Delta to get onboard and maybe treat students with dignity not only at this intersection, but also with the planned widening of Ladner Trunk East of Highway 17A and other projects.

Delta has an awesome opportunity to become a multi-modal city where all modes are treated fairly. In the future, I hope to see Delta taking the lead and building safer streets where everyone is welcome.

Ladner Transit Hub Concept

Sorry, mobile users, only Android has an app for Google Maps Engine so you can view the map above.

A friend of mine started this brilliant concept of Ladner being a transit hub that I previously hinted at. What he conceptualized was an extensive makeover for the network in South Delta and adding a (much needed) FTN link to the Tsawwassen Ferries. In the map above, you can see the tweaks that I made to his idea.

Conceptualized Routes:

  • C89 BOUNDARY BAY // TSAWWASSEN PARK & RIDE
  • C86 LADNER SOUTH // LADNER EXCH
  • C87 EAST LADNER // LADNER EXCH
  • C84 ENGLISH BLUFF // TSAWWASSEN PARK & RIDE
  • C76 SCOTTSDALE EXCH // LADNER EXCH
  • C88 LADNER NORTH // LADNER EXCH
  • 404 BRIGHOUSE // RICHPORT
  • 601 SOUTH DELTA // BRIDGEPORT STN
  • 640 SCOTT RD STN // LADNER EXCH, VIA TILBURY
  • 650 SCOTT RD // LADNER EXCH, EXPRESS
  • 660 WHITE ROCK CTR // LADNER EXCH
  • 699 TSAWWASSEN FERRY // BRIDGEPORT STN, B-LINE

South Delta Citizens and Rapid Transit

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Each year, Ipsos puts out a survey that surveys how people feel about their city. This year’s hot topic? Transportation.

Transportation is the number one issue concerning people and for 44% of the survey responses. Of that 44%, 6% of the concern was around public transit subcategory– the second biggest concern in the category. Where there is concern, there is demand. Most people just need a more frequent and convenient transit network to get them to leave their cars at home.

In a recent statement on expanding rapid transit to South of the Fraser, the CEO of TransLink, Ian Jarvis stated that “[he] wouldn’t say it’s a ‘dream.’ (Light rail) is something we need to look at in terms of how the Lower Mainland is going to develop.”

A comment made by Marvin Boutlier on that article made me think about expanding rapid transit to Ladner– and at first it seems like it would never work, but after taking a closer look at the idea, it makes a whole lot of sense.

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A radical idea for a South Fraser LRT line.

Right now, 40 buses use the Hwy 99 corridor per hour at peak times. Most of these busses (the 351, 352, 354, 404, 601, 602, 603, 604 & 620 to name a few) run through the tunnel and feed an overcrowded Bridgeport Station.

If light rail were to connect South Delta in Ladner at Hwy 17 and Ladner Trunk, all the buses that typically run through the tunnel can connect at Ladner thusly reducing the cost to run them (noting that South Delta is the most expensive region TransLink operates in).

With a new Hwy 17 on the South Fraser Perimeter Road the repurposed Hwy 17a is the perfect corridor for buses to connect to Ladner, especially with the new separated lane at exit 28 on Hwy 99.